Behold! The mighty, all-in-one, portable Fisher Price turntable. It’s a beauty.

Uncle Walt - Live from the Magic Kingdom

Bottom line: Disney put out some of the finest music ever found on any soundtrack in the history of soundtracking.  If your soul isn’t moved in some way back to the halcyon days of your childhood, perhaps your soul’s condition needs examined.

Featuring songs from: 101 Dalmatians Lady and the Tramp Snow White & The Seven Dwarves The Little Mermaid Sleeping Beauty The Jungle Book The Aristocats Robin Hood Beauty and the Beast Dumbo Alice in Wonderland Aladdin Peter Pan The Great Mouse Detective The Lion King Hercules

(Source: 8tracks.com)

How perfect a setting for this song.  Bang Pop by Free Energy is absolute pop perfection and entirely fitting for those freewheeling high school days.  I love it.  It’s entirely infectious and I’m sure it’ll be all over the radio soon. 

Supertramp’s Cannonball off the A&M label in 1985.
Designer: Norman Moore

Supertramp’s Cannonball off the A&M label in 1985.

Designer: Norman Moore

The Roy Lichtenstein-inspired art from Squeeze’s Goodbye Girl, released by A&M in 1978.
Designer: No information available.

The Roy Lichtenstein-inspired art from Squeeze’s Goodbye Girl, released by A&M in 1978.

Designer: No information available.

Today’s Listening

After scoring a bunch of new gems, nuggets and sounds, I made up my mind to listen to them today at work, because, well, I can. 

Hitting lead off: Cornershop and the Double-O Groove Of featuring Bubbley Kaur.  Consider it pop with a Punjabi punch.

In the two spot: Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears’ Scandalous.  I fell over on my face after listening to their first record and this snuck in under my radar.  Clearly my game needs tightening, because if a band I enjoy this much snuck by unnoticed I must be slipping. Reviews to follow for this funk/soul bouillabaisse.

Hitting third and playing left field: Fitz and the Tantrums Pickin’ Up the Pieces.  I’ve talked these cats up to a ton of my friends and they’ve yet to disappoint.  The band is a hybrid Motown/Stax beat monster churning out new soul with killer back beats.  Love these fuckers.  They also got rave reviews from SXSW.

Cleaning up: Drive-By Truckers Go-Go Boots.  This three-guitar wielding band has become the go-to group to back up great singers.  I’m stoked for this brand of alternative country rock and I’m especially stoked to enter the lunch hour with four superb records in my head.  

Currently jamming to this throwback collection which spectacularly enough features a closed bag of coffee beans as a front cover.
This sprawling collection spans seven discs featuring the oft maligned but stunningly catchy U Can’t Touch This by M.C. Hammer, the swagger and stomp of Social Distortion’s Ball and Chain, the new jack swing of Ice T’s New Jack Hustler, the electronic flips, dips and squibs of the Stereo MCs Connected, the walking horror comic metal devastation of White Zombie’s Thunder Kiss ‘65, the power pop, shout-it-out-loud chorus of Gin Blossom’s Hey Jealousy, the inimitable radiant class of En Vogue with Free Your Mind… I mean, this set is pitch perfect from the folks at Rhino Records who rarely let me down.  We won’t discuss that six disc outtakes box of Iggy and the Stoooges. No, we won’t.
Revisiting an era of droopy-drawers rappers, bedroom beatmakers, and a musical revolution that was definitely televised, Rhino bridges the musical divides with the ultimate decade capsule.
This seven-disc, 130-track collection fuses everything image-shattering rocker Sinead O’Connor’s stunning cover of Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U,” to the arrival of the bruising locomotive hooks of Helmet (“Unsung”) and Pantera (“Walk”), all the way to the sample-hugged atmospherics of Moby’s “Natural Blues,” which wraps up the eight-hour-plus odyssey. Other artists include Oasis, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jewel, Aaliyah, Hanson, Primus, Busta Rhymes, Wilco, and many more.
Much like its sisters in Rhino’s cultural canon, Whatever boasts limited-edition packaging: a clear plastic pouch loaded with coffee beans secured by a thermal sleeve bearing an array of zeitgeist-capturing faux-corporate logos. Includes an 84-page book with essays by Jim DeRogatis, Joel Stein, Brian Ives, and Clark Humphrey, as well as a Q&A with SubPop cofounder Jonathan Poneman, track notes, and a fact-filled ’90s timeline.

Currently jamming to this throwback collection which spectacularly enough features a closed bag of coffee beans as a front cover.

This sprawling collection spans seven discs featuring the oft maligned but stunningly catchy U Can’t Touch This by M.C. Hammer, the swagger and stomp of Social Distortion’s Ball and Chain, the new jack swing of Ice T’s New Jack Hustler, the electronic flips, dips and squibs of the Stereo MCs Connected, the walking horror comic metal devastation of White Zombie’s Thunder Kiss ‘65, the power pop, shout-it-out-loud chorus of Gin Blossom’s Hey Jealousy, the inimitable radiant class of En Vogue with Free Your Mind… I mean, this set is pitch perfect from the folks at Rhino Records who rarely let me down.  We won’t discuss that six disc outtakes box of Iggy and the Stoooges. No, we won’t.

Revisiting an era of droopy-drawers rappers, bedroom beatmakers, and a musical revolution that was definitely televised, Rhino bridges the musical divides with the ultimate decade capsule.

This seven-disc, 130-track collection fuses everything image-shattering rocker Sinead O’Connor’s stunning cover of Prince’s “Nothing Compares 2 U,” to the arrival of the bruising locomotive hooks of Helmet (“Unsung”) and Pantera (“Walk”), all the way to the sample-hugged atmospherics of Moby’s “Natural Blues,” which wraps up the eight-hour-plus odyssey. Other artists include Oasis, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Jewel, Aaliyah, Hanson, Primus, Busta Rhymes, Wilco, and many more.

Much like its sisters in Rhino’s cultural canon, Whatever boasts limited-edition packaging: a clear plastic pouch loaded with coffee beans secured by a thermal sleeve bearing an array of zeitgeist-capturing faux-corporate logos. Includes an 84-page book with essays by Jim DeRogatis, Joel Stein, Brian Ives, and Clark Humphrey, as well as a Q&A with SubPop cofounder Jonathan Poneman, track notes, and a fact-filled ’90s timeline.

Currently reading. It’s terrible but I have a disease that forces me to push through.

Currently reading. It’s terrible but I have a disease that forces me to push through.

My Childhood at 45 Revolutions Per Minute

These songs served as a huge piece of my inspiration as a kid. You hear Rice Krispies (Snaps, Crackles and Pops) because they were recorded off the original vinyl. Have a boat load of fun.

In no particular order:

  • The Boy from New York City - The Ad-Libs
  • Bend Me, Shape Me - The American Breed
  • Rhythm of the Rain - The Cascades
  • Let’s Dance - Chris Montez
  • The Pied Piper - Crispian St. Peters
  • Glad All Over - The Dave Clark Five
  • Come Go With Me - The Del Vikings
  • The Wonder of You - Elvis
  • Midnight Confessions - The Grass Roots
  • The Rapper - The Jaggerz
  • Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie - Jay and The Techniques
  • Little Bit O’Soul - The Music Explosion
  • Needles and Pins - The Searchers
  • Everyday People - Sly & The Family Stone
  • Sweet City Woman - The Stampeders
  • Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye - Steam
  • Five O’Clock World - The Vogues
  • I Can See For Miles - The Who

(Source: 8tracks.com)

Everything about this is terrible, just terrible. It’s the sonic equivalent of an airbrushed photo, but admit it, you love this.

Deep down inside, if you had just the right number of drink to tip the scales, you would karaoke the FUCK out of this.

(Source: 405s, via naduvidablefe)

One of my favorite obscure rock tracks from 1966. Play loudly. 

pazespa:

Encontré el cable que le permite a mi tocadiscos pasar los acetatos que tengo en mi casa. Así que porque no compartirles un poco de mi felicidad. 

Black is Black / Los Bravos / EP (45 rpm)

eatmyhandbagbitch:

Gillian Hills  ”Zou bisou bisou”

(Source: loungeking, via mudwerks)

The Beatles’ first American show. This is not Ed Sullivan. This is not Shea Stadium. This is numbero uno.

Pop Tops by Wade Griffith on Flickr.Us Michigan kids call it pop. 
You probably call it soda. We forgive you.

Pop Tops by Wade Griffith on Flickr.

Us Michigan kids call it pop.
You probably call it soda. We forgive you.