Let’s see some pictures of your desk/workspace.  

(Source: azuo)

Tags: Desk Design

Atlanta-based photographer Rob Brinson has had this loft studio in the King Plow Art Center, a former plow factory from the 1800s, for 23 years now. Today it’s the full-time studio space he always dreamed of when he first became a photographer. He and his wife, Jill Sharp Brinson, stylist, designer and creative director for Ballard Designs, lived there full-time for six years but now use the living spaces as a getaway and a crash-pad for friends and relatives. I’ve always dreamed of living in a loft, and this sneak peek only encourages the dream! Check out the full-sized images here.

Read more at Design*Sponge http://www.designspongeonline.com/page/3#ixzz1CLODs0lK

This is probably the most stylish baseball has been since the invention of pinstripes.  Very superfans only, this thing really has it all. 

As a kid in Detroit I grew up with Alan Trammel and Lou Whitaker turning double plays at the corner of Michigan and Trumball in the heart of the Motor City.  I learned how to keep score from the decidedly dedicated “Bleacher Creatures” in right and left centerfield. 

My childhood isn’t quite destroyed, though steroids in baseball, movies based on G.I. Joe, Transformers and the Dukes of Hazzard are doing their best to lay it to waste. 

Hope still springs eternal.  

I think I just got a hard on. 
thisispublictrust:

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I think I just got a hard on. 

thisispublictrust:

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Some vintage Braun goodness from the Dieter Rams Flickr Pool. Rams was the head of design at Braun A.G. during the heyday of industrial design. I think his philosophy is one we can all look to for inspiration:

Rams once explained his design approach in the phrase “Weniger, aber besser” which freely translates as “Less, but better.” – Wikipedia

Some more perfection from Dieter Rams via his very own flickr pool.

(Source: blog.iso50.com)

Tags: Design Radio

Audiophile porn from the likes of Dieter Rams.

Audiophile porn from the likes of Dieter Rams.

Bruce Mau’s Incomplete Manifesto for Growth

This design manifesto was first written by Bruce Mau in 1998, articulating his beliefs, strategies, and motivations. It has since had an amazing journey around the internet, even inspiring young designers to create posters and/or book covers for it.

  1. Allow events to change you. You have to be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it. You live it. The prerequisites for growth: the openness to experience events and the willingness to be changed by them.
  2. Forget about good. Good is a known quantity. Good is what we all agree on. Growth is not necessarily good. Growth is an exploration of unlit recesses that may or may not yield to our research. As long as you stick to good you’ll never have real growth.
  3. Process is more important than outcome. When the outcome drives the process we will only ever go to where we’ve already been. If process drives outcome we may not know where we’re going, but we will know we want to be there.
  4. Love your experiments (as you would an ugly child). Joy is the engine of growth. Exploit the liberty in casting your work as beautiful experiments, iterations, attempts, trials, and errors. Take the long view and allow yourself the fun of failure every day.
  5. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.
  6. Capture accidents. The wrong answer is the right answer in search of a different question. Collect wrong answers as part of the process. Ask different questions.
  7. Study. A studio is a place of study. Use the necessity of production as an excuse to study. Everyone will benefit.
  8. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.
  9. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.
  10. Everyone is a leader. Growth happens. Whenever it does, allow it to emerge. Learn to follow when it makes sense. Let anyone lead.
  11. Harvest ideas. Edit applications. Ideas need a dynamic, fluid, generous environment to sustain life. Applications, on the other hand, benefit from critical rigor. Produce a high ratio of ideas to applications.
  12. Keep moving. The market and its operations have a tendency to reinforce success. Resist it. Allow failure and migration to be part of your practice.
  13. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.
  14. Don’t be cool. Cool is conservative fear dressed in black. Free yourself from limits of this sort.
  15. Ask stupid questions. Growth is fueled by desire and innocence. Assess the answer, not the question. Imagine learning throughout your life at the rate of an infant.
  16. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.
  17. ____________________. Intentionally left blank. Allow space for the ideas you haven’t had yet, and for the ideas of others.
  18. Stay up late. Strange things happen when you’ve gone too far, been up too long, worked too hard, and you’re separated from the rest of the world.
  19. Work the metaphor. Every object has the capacity to stand for something other than what is apparent. Work on what it stands for.
  20. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.
  21. Repeat yourself. If you like it, do it again. If you don’t like it, do it again.
  22. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.
  23. Stand on someone’s shoulders. You can travel farther carried on the accomplishments of those who came before you. And the view is so much better.
  24. Avoid software. The problem with software is that everyone has it.
  25. Don’t clean your desk. You might find something in the morning that you can’t see tonight.
  26. Don’t enter awards competitions. Just don’t. It’s not good for you.
  27. Read only left-hand pages. Marshall McLuhan did this. By decreasing the amount of information, we leave room for what he called our “noodle.”
  28. Make new words. Expand the lexicon. The new conditions demand a new way of thinking. The thinking demands new forms of expression. The expression generates new conditions.
  29. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device-dependent.
  30. Organization = Liberty. Real innovation in design, or any other field, happens in context. That context is usually some form of cooperatively managed enterprise. Frank Gehry, for instance, is only able to realize Bilbao because his studio can deliver it on budget. The myth of a split between “creatives” and “suits” is what Leonard Cohen calls a ‘charming artifact of the past.’
  31. Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.
  32. Listen carefully. Every collaborator who enters our orbit brings with him or her a world more strange and complex than any we could ever hope to imagine. By listening to the details and the subtlety of their needs, desires, or ambitions, we fold their world onto our own. Neither party will ever be the same.
  33. Take field trips. The bandwidth of the world is greater than that of your TV set, or the Internet, or even a totally immersive, interactive, dynamically rendered, object-oriented, real-time, computer graphic–simulated environment.
  34. Make mistakes faster. This isn’t my idea — I borrowed it. I think it belongs to Andy Grove.
  35. Imitate. Don’t be shy about it. Try to get as close as you can. You’ll never get all the way, and the separation might be truly remarkable. We have only to look to Richard Hamilton and his version of Marcel Duchamp’s large glass to see how rich, discredited, and underused imitation is as a technique.
  36. Scat. When you forget the words, do what Ella did: make up something else … but not words.
  37. Break it, stretch it, bend it, crush it, crack it, fold it.
  38. Explore the other edge. Great liberty exists when we avoid trying to run with the technological pack. We can’t find the leading edge because it’s trampled underfoot. Try using old-tech equipment made obsolete by an economic cycle but still rich with potential.
  39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces — what Dr. Seuss calls “the waiting place.” Hans Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference — the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals — but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.
  40. Avoid fields. Jump fences. Disciplinary boundaries and regulatory regimes are attempts to control the wilding of creative life. They are often understandable efforts to order what are manifold, complex, evolutionary processes. Our job is to jump the fences and cross the fields.
  41. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.
  42. Remember. Growth is only possible as a product of history. Without memory, innovation is merely novelty. History gives growth a direction. But a memory is never perfect. Every memory is a degraded or composite image of a previous moment or event. That’s what makes us aware of its quality as a past and not a present. It means that every memory is new, a partial construct different from its source, and, as such, a potential for growth itself.
  43. Power to the people. Play can only happen when people feel they have control over their lives. We can’t be free agents if we’re not free.
    The latest poster for my Ear Candy Update music podcast.  Get the freshest, most rockingest music delivered right to your delicious ear drums whenever you want it.  This is radio as it was meant to be. 

    The latest poster for my Ear Candy Update music podcast.  Get the freshest, most rockingest music delivered right to your delicious ear drums whenever you want it.  This is radio as it was meant to be. 

    We all love short animated films, but creating short film is very hard task. Putting whole story in 5 to 10 minutes is not easy. Can you imagine? Few films produced after working hard more than 6 years! Here we collected 15 dazzling animated short films for your inspiration. You can find different genres in these movies like heart-touching film One life, frightening filmThe Passenger.

    I bet you will love these short animated movies, do let us know your favorite one, also feel free to share your favorite short film if it’s not present in the list.

    First of all, AMC needs to stop bullshitting and get on the case with season five of Mad Men.  It is without question in the top tier of current television programming. 

    Secondly, these fantastic looking designs by Radio, a creative studio out of Cape Town, South Africa, are going up on my wall most riki-tik.

    nickelsonwooster:

#thinkdifferent
washingtonpoststyle:

“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever — because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well-worn path.” 
Steve Jobs (1955-2011), in his 2005 commencement address at Stanford.

    nickelsonwooster:

    #thinkdifferent

    washingtonpoststyle:

    “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever — because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart, even when it leads you off the well-worn path.” 

    Steve Jobs (1955-2011), in his 2005 commencement address at Stanford.

    From the exhibit ‘Graphic Design: Now in Production’ at Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

    From the exhibit ‘Graphic Design: Now in Production’ at Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

    A wedding invite from British Intelligence?

    A wedding invite from British Intelligence?

    Moxy Creative House presents Touristique, a series of five illus­trated posters based on major cities. They’re avail­able for pur­chase right here.

    I need more flowers in my bedroom. Clearly. 

    I need more flowers in my bedroom. Clearly.